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LoraM

Lora's Rants and Reviews

My own unapologetic opinions on books and writing.

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Time Storm Shockwave

Time Storm Shockwave - Juliann Farnsworth

by Julienne Farnsworth

 

Have to love time travel that starts with an Einstein quote.

 

The Prologue explains a load of science, so it's definitely my kind of thing. The Earth's magnetosphere and the relationship of time, electromagnetic energy and gravity in Einstein's theories are neatly explained within context of the story. It also gives a theory of naturally occurring wormholes to explain things like the Bermuda Triangle.

 

So, the story in Chapter 1 starts with the sinking of Mauritania, then shows a tribal group of Time keepers in 98b.c. building pyramids, then jumps to 1943 and the military experimenting with time and space travel in the Bermuda triangle. At this stage it's not clear where the story is going to go, but it has reasonably good descriptive writing and I found myself feeling drawn in. There have been a few typos, but not so many that it brings me out of the story.

 

Some Bermuda triangle time and space distortions get into this one. The instruments and pilots on a routine military flight in the triangle become disoriented and suddenly find themselves off the Pacific coast. The cover up of the anomaly is more frightening than the anomaly itself, but recorded in history as a mystery.

 

Eventually we meet our protagonist, and Marine Biologist named Mark who is studying electromagnetic energies in the Bermuda Triangle area. His assistant, Stewart, is scared of the ocean, but swallows his fear to help his friend. Enter Ashlyn, a strange woman who arranges to meet Mark. Stewart immediately doesn't trust her and we soon learn why.

 

The story has out of the ordinary characters, some interesting twists and turns, and a few surprises. Much of it reads more like an espionage story, and around halfway I was wondering what happened to the time travel aspect. It does come back in later on. However, the story started to lose me just after halfway. Ashlyn, for reasons I don't want to spoil is supposed to be very sharp, but suddenly starts behaving stupidly. The typos increase in the second half and the story moves into the fantastical, which isn't a problem in itself but I suddenly felt like I was reading a different story.

 

In its favor, the story has a lot of references to genuine Physics and had me looking up a few things. The factual information is entwined with some science fiction fairly neatly, which enjoyed. However, the tone of the story changed in ways that made my assessment plummet from a possible 5 star read to the 3.5 that I've given it. I'd say it's a worthwhile read for time travel fans, but not going on my favorites shelf.